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What is the Jack Jamesen Memorial Park?

In the mid 90’s local builder and developer Dave Blauert donated a parcel of land to the City of Sedona. He was mourning the loss of a friend, Jack Jamesen, as were several other service-oriented men in the community. Jack had been an original founder and a bigSite plan for Jack Jamesen supporter of Sedona 30 and a contributor to many additional service organizations in the Verde Valley, and so, the “pocket park” was named after him.  “I know that my dad would be so proud to be associated with such a lovely sculpture garden dedicated to citizens who care about the community and service to others.” –stated Jill Galea, Chairperson of the Honoring Women Committee of the park.

On March 1, 2014, The Sedona Military Service Park was unveiled in the Jack Jamesen Memorial Park and dedicated to the City of Sedona. Applications continue to be accepted for inscription on the granite walls and all details are available at the city’s website: www.sedonaaz.gov. Granite walls, benches and flags honoring all five branches of the military are visible from State Route 89A and occupy the front section of the Jack Jamesen Memorial Park. The Sedona Marine Corp League and Sedona Korean American Association sought support from local clubs and organizations, including The Sedona 30 and made this section of the park possible. This area of the park honors local men and women who have honorably served our country during peace and war.

The original landscape architect, Dick Hubble, designed the park with separate featured areas of the garden in mind. The Honoring Women Committee began meeting in February 2014 to create a section of the park for that purpose. This area includes a bronze sculpture by James N. Muir, titled, Cornerstones of Freedom, and green granite walls on either side in honor women who have made contributions and indelible impressions on those dear to them. Applications are currently being taken for those inscriptions and all details are available at our “Be A Friend Page”.

Today the park is a jewel in the center of West Sedona. It also includes a North American Indian sculpture by John Soderberg, Ph.D. titled, Invocation, a bronze relief of Jack Jamesen by Sculptor Leslie B. DeMille and a plaque listing the original contributors and service clubs that have supported the Park since its inception. The Park has room for five more sculptures and areas according to the original site plan.

“Both of my parents, father Jack and mother Gail, loved beautiful Sedona, and they both believed in the intrinsic value of service work, supporting one’s community in whatever ways an individual is able.”  Jill added, “Whether it be time, treasure or talent, a community is only as strong as the commitment of its citizens to support It. It gives me heartfelt pleasure to honor my mother, along with the other women on the granite walls, it is a lasting legacy that they each deserve for their contributions to our community and to the world.”




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